Muscular Christianity

Muscular Christianity is a philosophical movement that originated in England in the mid-19th century, characterised by a belief in patriotic duty, discipline, self-sacrifice, manliness, and the moral and physical beauty of athleticism.

Muscular Christianity 2

The movement came into vogue during the Victorian era as a method of building character in pupils at English public schools. It is most often associated with English author Thomas Hughes and his 1857 novel Tom Brown’s School Days, as well as writers Charles Kingsley and Ralph Connor. American President Theodore Roosevelt was raised in a household that practised Muscular Christianity. Roosevelt, Kingsley, and Hughes promoted physical strength and health as well as an active pursuit of Christian ideals in personal life and politics. Muscular Christianity has continued through organizations that combine physical and Christian spiritual development. It is influential within both Catholicism and Protestantism.

For more on our religious rites and customs, see Advent, Hot Cross Buns, Maundy Thursday, Episcopalians and Celtic Cross.

8 thoughts on “Muscular Christianity

  1. We all grew up with just the very basics.

    We didn’t have a colour television until the mid 1970s. Thankfully, my father worked and worked very hard. My mother also had several part time jobs but, because we were quite a large family, we couldn’t afford to go on vacations and holidays. We did go on day trips to the seaside. Usually, we would go to Ayr, Largs, Troon and the likes. We had very memorable times.

    Today kid’s have more than enough. They all have expensive clothes, all the top of the range gadgets, good homes and top notch accessories and technology.

    Why are there so many suicides? We are hearing about this every single week in Britain. How is this? How and who is going to get to the bottom of it?

    The mainstream media only care about demonising the working class white British people. We are being oppressed, made to look stupid and racists, but we are the spine of the country.

    The spoiled brat brigade, you know the ones, the so called celebs and university students who think they are above everyone else, think the working class are trash. Well, we are anything but trash and we do actually contribute to society and our beloved country.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Artwirk368 for your comments here and apologies it’s taken so long to reply.

      The Thinking WASP was launched, in part, because of the observations you make and that we aren’t taught just how good we are as a people.

      Take heart!

      The future is brighter than you imagine. On exploring The Thinking WASP blog some more. you’ll discover

      * How the most humble rise to great heights (read Exemplar: Hillary, Exemplar: Cook, Exemplar: Mawson, Exemplar: Mackenzie and Exemplar: Armstrong)

      * How our values make it possible (read Protestant Work Ethic, The Gentleman, Muscular Christianity)

      * How the very countries of our beloved Anglosphere are full of such physical beauty (read The Celtic Wilds, Lonely Column, Liquid Turquoise, Cushendun, Frosted Vermont and Whitby)

      * And how we can relish it all with examples of our very own cuisine (read Hard Boiled, Lemon Meringue, Mighty Ginger Wallop, Cornish Pastie, Pavlova and Boston Cream Pie).

      There’s so much of you in this site. Each post is a tiny touchstone of our culture, not just of the British Isles which is part of your very marrow, but of the great Anglo-Celtic Diaspora which it created worldwide.

      There’s so much fun and reason to be thankful.

      Enjoy!

      Liked by 2 people

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